Universe of Amsterdam: great exhibition at Royal Palace Amsterdam

After a summer full of map stuff (hosting the International Conference on the History of Cartography in Amsterdam in July was definately a highlight and an incredible adventure for me. Now, I am back at Mapsandthecity.com and planning to pick up on blogging more often. So, if you have any mappy suggestions for me to blog about, feel free to drop me a note!

But first things first. You still have a few weeks left (until 22 September to be exact) to visit an incredible exhibition in Amsterdam: The Universe of Amsterdam in the Royal Palace Amsterdam.
The eye catchers of the exhibition (but actually for the palace itself as well!) are the huge floor maps in the middle of the Citizen’s Hall of the Royal Palace. They are the largest maps in the entire world! The three maps of the world and the night sky each measure 624 centimetres in diameter. They are an essential part of the design conceived by the architect Jacob van Campen for this building: his entire concept was based on creating the impressive town hall as a miniature universe. Hence the title of the exhibition.

The exhibition focuses on the role of Amsterdam in the Golden Age: productivity of maps and atlases was huge in Amsterdam in the seventeenth and eighteenth century. The great and informative exhibition in produced in partnership with Allard Pierson│ The Collections of the University of Amsterdam, and contains beautiful loans such as the impressive Blaeu Cabinet.
Make sure to visit this expo before September 22!

Feeling Blaeu

Well, you can definitely add this one to your to do list when visiting Amsterdam this summer: go see the exhibition ‘The world according to Blaeu | Master Cartographer of the Golden Age’ in Het Scheepvaartmuseum (the maritime museum in Amsterdam). The centerpiece of this exhibition is a huge map of the world by Joan Blaeu, dating from 1648. Visitors -older & young, because you better start infusing map love to your young ones rather early!- can look into the tiniest details on the map using magnifying glasses. It’s on show until 31 December, so make sure you fit it into your plans for that upcoming city trip to Amsterdam.

33241749703_bc124b3223_k

33241477363_8ef510c0c7_o

Photo credits: Kenneth Stamp

Pssst: Remember the map jacket photo shoot I did back in 2012? That was also at the Scheepvaartmuseum, one of my favourite museums in Amsterdam.
MATCphotos

Can I get that Globe in 4D?

This is an interesting way of presenting knowledge. Meet Globe4D: an interactive installation for globe viewing, used by museums, schools and universities to exhibit or discuss knowledge. It is possible to show changes over time, climate differences, air plane routes… I like the way this tool makes the Earth (or another planet) more tangible. It works like this: the planet is projected on a sphere. By rotating the sphere it can be observed from any angle. A ring, fitted around the sphere, allows the user to manipulate the fourth dimension by turning it. This can be time or any other variable (e.g. waterlevel, zoom). The installation was originally developed in a researchgroup at the University of Leiden in the Netherlands. I can see the use of this for many institutions and exhibitions!